Walkovers!

Discussion in 'Skills' started by coachFIERCE, Apr 24, 2011.

  1. coachFIERCE

    coachFIERCE I'm an announcer on CBS for Worlds (or should be)

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    Any suggestions on stretches, conditioning exercises, and/or drills to do in preparation for front and back walkovers? I'm guessing a lot of core work needs to be done (prone holds, supermans, bird dogs, crunches, etc.), but shoulder flexibility and whatnot too, right?

    (Me, not know a thing about tumbling? How ever did you guess?! :p In all seriousness though, I've done some Googling around the interwebs and whatnot to compile my own list of drills and such for walkovers... but I'd still appreciate anything and everything you wonderful Fiercers can share!)

    Thanks in advance! :D

     
  2. ellie

    ellie I text ACEDAD all the time

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    to get my walkovers i worked on my bridges and bridge kick overs and that rly helped my back flexibility!
    hope this helps!:)
     
  3. iluvcheer

    iluvcheer Best Flyer.. on a parent team

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    When I was working on walkovers in gymnastics, I worked on abs for front walkovers because you need stomach muscles to pull you up to stand. On back walkovers I did a lot of bridge kickovers and back flexibilty drills. once you get walkovers, they're really fun so keep working and you'll get them soon:)
     
  4. createmagic

    createmagic Last Pass... on International Open 1

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    Bridges. Bridge, lift one leg and hold. Lift the other leg and hold.
    Bridge kickovers down a hill or off a panel mat. Slowly move down hill, or lower the number of panels used until you are doing one on the floor. If your arms are bending/head on the ground, move back up.
    Work shoulder strength and flexibility.
    Lots of handstands.
    When it comes to actually doing back walkovers, remember to stretch tall first, watch your hands, and be sure your hands hit before your bottom leg pushes off the ground.

    ETA: Shoulder flexibility is MUCH more important that back flexibility. Ideally, you use the flexibility in your shoulders more than your back--that way you can help avoid some back pain.
     
  5. createmagic

    createmagic Last Pass... on International Open 1

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    Ugh, didn't finish my last thoughts in time. Also needed to add:

    Front walkovers: handstand to bridge. Handstand to bridge and stand. This can also be done down a hill. Once that skill is mastered, work on the actual "walkover" part of it--stepping out with one foot. Kids should be planting that first foot, pushing through, and thinking about stepping forward with the front foot. If they are a "righty" cartwheeler, the left foot should land first, stepping out with the right. Arms should stay tight by ears at all times, and head should be looking at the hands. Otherwise, you lose the arch.
     
  6. Zinger_bebe

    Zinger_bebe Slow your roll, Sparkle.

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    Back walkover - I remember (back in the day) arching and reaching for the ground off the side of the couch or a bed. Once my hands hit the ground I would kick over. Worked well for my CP too. The front walkover was harder for my daughter than anything she has learned yet - including BHS!! As @createmagic said, handstand to bridge and then stand up. Working on this downhill helps as well. CP had an easier time learning this with a two step hurdle - once she landed it with the momentum, she learned to do it standing. Hope this helps!! :)
     
  7. MomOf2ThatsMe

    MomOf2ThatsMe Slow your roll, Sparkle.

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    I'm not a tumbling instructor by any means, but I think the most important thing to make a beautiful back walkover is when you are standing there before you drop back into a bridge, make sure one of your feet is in further away from you than the other, versus side by side. Once you drop back you will be able to start your walkover in a much more fluid manner. When you stand with your feet next to eachother, most people have to sort of get their footing before they kick, and it creates a pause.
     
  8. createmagic

    createmagic Last Pass... on International Open 1

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    Ultimately, that is the goal, however there are so many more steps leading up to that actual skill. The one foot up, stretch, reach back to hands and kick over fluidly is only accomplished once you can successfully completely everything in between!
     
  9. cartwheels&cupcakes

    cartwheels&cupcakes I text ACEDAD all the time

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    Do a lot of bridge walks across the floor to help with shoulder flexibility
     
  10. Tess (:

    Tess (: I'm new. Don't Hurt Me

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    In gymnastics we would bridge up close 2 a wall and try to push our armpits to the wall (I think to open up your shoulders so it's easier to kick over). If you want to make it fun try having bridge wars with some friends :)
     
  11. MissBee

    MissBee Slow your roll, Sparkle.

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    SHOULDER FLEXIBILITY!!!

    sorry, it's just THAT important to walkovers (and when they get older, it'll help with stunting if they're a flyer).
     
  12. hopskipandjump

    hopskipandjump I named my pet Sir Fierce-a-lot

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    Miss Bee, what exercises can you do for that?
     
  13. MissBee

    MissBee Slow your roll, Sparkle.

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    Here are a few done with a partner:
    1. sit on floor in a pike, reach arms behind back, have partner lift arms up toward head (put hand on biceps, not elbows-as holding/pulling from a joint puts extra pressure on the joint-always put hands above the joint, not below).
    2. push up into a bridge. The proper bridge form is to have straight arms (perpendicular to floor) and straight legs. Have partner stand near your hands and gently pull (put hands on shoulder blades) towards you to get the arms straight.
    3. lay flat on stomach (some may call this prone, but that is up for debate), with arms by your side. Have partner gently lift arms toward head.
    4. lay on stomach with arms above head (arms by ears, palms down) have partner lift arms back.
     
  14. hopskipandjump

    hopskipandjump I named my pet Sir Fierce-a-lot

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    Thank you so much! I plan to use these at the next practice for sure.
     
  15. MissBee

    MissBee Slow your roll, Sparkle.

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    Only pull to the point where you start to feel the stretch, and only hold for 10 seconds. You can repeat the stretch after a rest and shaking out your shoulders. If you go too far or too long you can injure your ligaments.