Athletes With Asthma

Discussion in 'Cheer Newbies' started by glitzmom, Dec 2, 2012.

  1. Fameous MOM

    Fameous MOM I'm an announcer on CBS for Worlds (or should be)

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    Works every time;)
     
  2. CheerBank

    CheerBank Slow your roll, Sparkle.

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    REALLY good to know!
     
  3. AllstarObsession

    AllstarObsession Slow your roll, Sparkle.

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    Does anyone take their inhaler before they compete?

    I have exercise induced asthma that was diagnosed after I could NOT get up after the routine this past weekend. I have severe back problems and that plus going into a full on asthma attack before the routine was even finished was just too much for me.

    An inhaler with albuterol helped calm me down initially, and Im still having this horrible cough.

    Anyhow, my question is about everyones experience with using an inhaler immediately before competing. I have three different teammates say that it has made them forget the routine. Obviously I don't want to forget what I'm doing, but I would also like to prevent the inevitable asthma attack.
     
  4. AlyandAndrea

    AlyandAndrea Cheer Stalker

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    Hi there-
    Regarding fear of appearing "weak to her team"... there are three components of education that will help your CP. I suggest all three in combination and on an ongoing, regular basis. (Please note I'm mentioning these things not because you specifically are missing the boat- I'm speaking on a broad level about the situation in general rather than your individual case):
    1. Educate the CP for the importance of self-care
    2. Educate the coach to facilitate that self-care
    3. Educate the team about the situation and how they can help
    To elaborate on each point:
    1. Educating the CP sometimes can mean the ongoing dialogue of how important it is to catch the signs early because at various points in adolescence, these kids are so vested in not looking "different" that it will influence their behavior in ways that don't always protect their health and well-being. Something along the lines of 'being part of the team is about being responsible enough to take care of yourself proactively- you can't be a participant that helps the team if you're allowing yourself to get into critical health situations.'
    2. Educating the coach to facilitate self-care can mean helping every coach understand what the issue is, why it happens, what the signals are, how to speak to the CP about it, and working with them to create a standard system of care that can be implemented. This will allow the coach to not just "accept" the asthma (or other limitation of a CP) but to have authority to "expect" that the athlete communicate effectively about early signals that only they can determine. It also allows for preparedness. I have run many events and I cannot tell you how many times kids have come off the floor needing asthma pumps and coaches had to chase parents down in the stands to get it. A good system (i.e. coach has the asthma pumps with them at competition for easy access) is critical.
    3. Educate the team can mean having the open dialogue with the team. I've coached many different teams and have had these types of conversations over and over and over- in NO case have I ever seen kids not accept the need for assistance. People support a solution for things they understand, especially if it benefits them, as well. Teaching teammates what the needs are, and how they will be solved, will remove the jealousy or potential frustration and allow the team to give a supportive environment for positive outcomes.

    Wow- long post. I hope you find that helpful... all the best to you and your CP.
     
  5. emilycheers

    emilycheers I'm new. Don't Hurt Me

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    I also have asthma, sometimes that makes training hard.
    i talked to my doctor about my issue of exercise induced attacks, he suggest taking a dose of the inhaler before cheer! i do it EVERY time i go to practice/compete!
    hope this helps!!
     
  6. EricaElite

    EricaElite I think I can mix Cheer Music

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    I have exercise induced asthma as well. I don't use my inhaler as much as I should, but if I know we're going to have a hard practice, I make sure to use it. I'm not sure why, but when I come off the floor from competing, I need it much more than if I have done full outs at the gym. I think it's important to know your body and know when you need it, and know not to try to go without it. I don't think it looks weak to your teammates. I see it as the same as wearing a brace or something.

    My junior year in highschool I switched schools and was trying out for the cheer team there. The coach made us run a mile outside. After part of it, I asked the coach if I could go inside and get my inhaler (my mom told her I needed it beforehand) and she told me to "deal with it and run the mile"! Needless to say, I told her I was leaving and no longer trying out.