Flyer with hyperextended legs

Sterling von Shimmer

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I am double posting, but I need advice.

I have a flyer with hyperextended legs (they go backwards a little at the knee). I have them too, which is how I identified them in her (she didn’t realize).

This means that when I tell her to lock her knee out in stunts, she’s actually hyperextending it. IDK if this is the right thing for her to do since I’m pretty sure that means she’s putting a crazy amount of unnatural stress on the top and sides of the joint.

Has anyone else ever dealt with this? I think I have to come up with a way for her to literally keep her leg straight — as opposed to “locked out” — because “locked out” for her means “flexing so hard my leg goes a little bit backwards.” And I’m pretty sure if she keeps doing it she’s going to risk a bad knee injury.
 
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NJ Coach

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She should NOT be locking out. I don't know how old she is, but hypermobility is not a good thing, and could potentially be a sign of some not so great health issues. Make sure she's strengthening all her muscles. She actually will need to bend her knee slightly (done correctly, you won't even notice) in order to not hyperextend.
 

JBS

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    I have moved this out of the "random thread" as this is a great topic that may help others. Feel free to add more if you have experience with this.

    I have no experience with this in cheer... but it do in gymnastics (tons of it). I would offer the same exact advice as @NJ Coach.
     
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    Sterling von Shimmer

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    She should NOT be locking out. I don't know how old she is, but hypermobility is not a good thing, and could potentially be a sign of some not so great health issues. Make sure she's strengthening all her muscles. She actually will need to bend her knee slightly (done correctly, you won't even notice) in order to not hyperextend.
    Yeah that’s what I was afraid of. I’ll have to talk to her about keeping her weight cantered over her knee.

    I don’t think the hyper-mobility in her knees stems from an innate health issue as much as it does her prior ballet training, where it was probably considered a good thing. I can kind of tell by her body positions that the issue was probably encouraged instead of corrected. It goes beyond “okay this kid was born with loose ligaments whatever it happens” and into “she’s been training to accommodate this trait for awhile now.” So unfortunately I think we’re stuck with it at least for the time being.
     
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    NJ Coach

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    Yeah that’s what I was afraid of. I’ll have to talk to her about keeping her weight cantered over her knee.

    I don’t think the hyper-mobility in her knees stems from an innate health issue as much as it does her prior ballet training, where it was probably considered a good thing. I can kind of tell by her body positions that the issue was probably encouraged instead of corrected. It goes beyond “okay this kid was born with loose ligaments whatever it happens” and into “she’s been training to accommodate this trait for awhile now.” So unfortunately I think we’re stuck with it at least for the time being.
    Hypermobility can lead to pretty bad joint injuries. I'd really work on her strengthening the muscles and being very careful with tumbling. If she's old enough, I'd also talk to her parents about getting her in with a PT. @luv2cheer92 what are your thoughts?
     

    luv2cheer92

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    Hypermobility can lead to pretty bad joint injuries. I'd really work on her strengthening the muscles and being very careful with tumbling. If she's old enough, I'd also talk to her parents about getting her in with a PT. @luv2cheer92 what are your thoughts?
    I agree with everything you have said. Also definitely agree with recommending seeing a PT to help with strengthening the muscles around the knees to help better control the mobility. I would do it at any age. Kids with hypermobile joints are at a higher risk for injury, so being able to control that is important.
     

    catlady

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    Youngest has hyper-mobility and has dislocated her left knee three times, all with the planted foot and twist motion (playing tag, level 1 and level 2). As above posters said, it is all about strengthening the muscles around the knee. An orthopaedic would be able to feel the stability of the knee and could recommend a PT and fit her for a brace, if needed.

    Her PT suggested we let the pediatrician know, and because of Google, I will tell you our pediatrician went ahead and screened her for hypermobility (Beighton score) which wasn't great. But, he listened to her heart, sounded great, and on the Joint Hypermobility Syndrome checklist, she didn't exhibit any other criteria other than her Beighton score (very good news). He said they aren't as concerned about multiple same joint dislocations with a good reason behind it, but the person that has multiple dislocations, clumsiness and sprains while doing normal things.
     
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    catlady

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    Sorry for the double post, but also very important, athletes with hypermobility should never perform any stretch exercises that would cause further joint hyper extension. Stretches such as doing a split with one foot on a beam while the other is on the floor is definitely off limits. If other athletes are helping stretch her, make sure they aren't pushing or pulling with force, hip dysplasia is also common with those with hypermobility.
     
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    NJ Coach

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    What health issues come with hyper mobility?
    I think my daughter arms and legs are hyper extended. I never knew this was an issue. And no coach or Dr for that matter have ever mentioned it.
    The major ones are Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and Hypermobility Spectrum Disorder. They are similar to each other and are both connective tissue disorders. There can also be IBS, arthritis, multiple sprains/strains, high risk for dislocations. It's not great. If you are concerned, ask your daughter's dr to look into it.
     

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