Real Sports With Bryant Gumbel

Discussion in 'Allstar Cheerleading' started by ATX Cheer Dad, Aug 25, 2021.

  1. oncecoolcoachnowmom

    oncecoolcoachnowmom Bestest Newbie '14

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    I have read and heard so much about certain gyms and owners ignoring parent and athlete reports.

    Or pushing kids and parents to speak to the team mom first and let that person decide whether to report it.

    If my child approaches me about abuse, and I tell you about it, and you tell me to go speak to someone else, my next call is going to be to law enforcement. And it’s not for the predator. It’s for me. I’ll be in jail. We’re both making the news tonight.
     
  2. TealArmySparkle

    TealArmySparkle When all else fails.... I shimmy

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    Thank you for raising attention to this as it is a very well put together piece and gets to the heart of the matter. It was horrible to hear the things those athletes faced and I really hope this is the start of the "unravelling" of systemic abuse that has been rife in cheerleading.

    Also if anyone doesn't have access to HBO Max I found a condensed version of it on this YouTube page:
    .
     
  3. catlady

    catlady Slow your roll, Sparkle.

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    Law enforcement should be the first call every time. The common thread, with every governing body, is people keep thinking they will take care of it and it's their priority. In the Real Sports documentary, it talks about other governing bodies reporting to Congress, as if that's the issue. Not so fun fact: The AMA stood before Congress and refused to open up their sexual abuse records to the public. Quote from the AJC article "Condemnation without Action"

    It has, however, fought to keep confidential a federal database of physicians disciplined for sexual misconduct and other transgressions. When a proposal to open the database emerged in Congress, a former House staff member said, the AMA “crushed it like a bug.”

    A little louder for the people in the back, the AMA told Congress "no" they weren't opening up their sexual abuse data base. It has been this way for as long as I can remember, and I'm old. What has been working is incredibly brave women speaking out on these predators and outing them for the vomit they are. The other thing mentioned in this documentary is how easy it is to Google someone's past, and while she was pointing the finger at the USASF, parents need to make this standard practice. Predators are opportunity seekers, and there's huge opportunity when people spend time blaming someone else.

    PLEASE stop thinking someone else will protect your child.
    PLEASE realize where ever children are present, child predators see opportunity.
    PLEASE realize adolescent teens are often one and done sexual offenders.
    PLEASE realize cell phones are where most predators open the line of communication first.
     
  4. Keep_Believing

    Keep_Believing Moderator

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  5. catlady

    catlady Slow your roll, Sparkle.

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    Read the following: Sex Offender Employment Laws and you will start to understand or at least question why it happens. Quote:

    Can a sex offender pass a background check? Whether employers can use information from the sex offender registry in hiring decisions depends on state laws—and misusing this information can have costly consequences.

    If you look at the list that is NOT allowed to use the data base for employment in CA, you will notice it's privately owned businesses. If you look at the list that CAN use the data base, they're government based agencies that have legal immunity. Let that soak in for a minute. You start understanding why privately owned businesses (any size) end up following insurance guidelines and consulting lawyers, instead of doing what most of us would consider common sense and basic human morality. My frustration when I consulted the Corp I worked for legal team, was almost everything I wanted to do or change would have one or more states where the law wasn't clearly defined, therefore, the answer was always "no." Another quote:

    “Person at risk” is not currently defined under the statute, and thus is left open to interpretation. A previous version of the statute defined person at risk as “a person who is or may be exposed to a risk of becoming a victim of a sex offense committed by the offender,” but this is not current law.

    This is why businesses (or governing bodies) that encompasses multiple states end up with rules only as strong as the weakest state laws (which is usually undefined). In other words, if they choose to ban every offender across the US, they may end up paying settlements to some of those offenders depending on the state. This is exactly why the NCAA is arguing they have no LEGAL responsibility to protect athletes from sexual abuse, the laws aren't clearly defined. The only answer I can come up with your question on "How is that possible?"

    Slap on the wrist = Repeat offenders.

    Repeat offenders + Undefined laws = Big money for the people in charge of making laws and can argue "neglect" to a jury full of people with human morality.

    Monetary settlements >protecting humans
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2021
  6. Keep_Believing

    Keep_Believing Moderator

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    I call BS! Not at you but at the situation! This happened in Texas which is an “at-will employment” state. He has to have some sick shady people with connections keeping him employed.

    At-will employment means that an employer may legally terminate employees for no reason but may not terminate someone for a reason that violates state or federal laws. As such, employees in Texas have few wrongful termination rights. ... Texas employers are not required to give one.”
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2021
  7. catlady

    catlady Slow your roll, Sparkle.

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    I agree, but quoting from another legal site on How To Sue For Wrongful Termination in an At Will State:

    Many assume that in an at will state, where employers can fire employees without just cause, it’s not possible to sue for wrongful termination. However, even in at will states, employers must follow employment laws.

    Which then in full circle comes back to Sex Offender Employer Laws I quoted above:

    Can a sex offender pass a background check? Whether employers can use information from the sex offender registry in hiring decisions depends on state laws—and misusing this information can have costly consequences.

    I'm telling you, these laws could be clearly defined and the loopholes closed, but they don't do it.
     
  8. catlady

    catlady Slow your roll, Sparkle.

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    New article (Sept 15, 2021):
    'We suffered and continue to suffer': Simone Biles, elite gymnasts blast FBI over failing to stop Larry Nassar abuse <article>
    ^^^^

    During her testimony, Maroney slammed the FBI for falsifying her claims of abuse against Nassar.

    “After telling my entire story of abuse to the FBI in the summer of 2015, not only did the FBI not report my abuse, but when they eventually documented my report 17 months later, they made entirely false claims about what I said," said Maroney.

    “What is the point of reporting abuse, if our own FBI agents are going to take it upon themselves to bury that report in the drawer?" Maroney asked.